Gill Springgay has been nominated in the Positive Role Model category at the National Diversity Awards 2019 for her work in styling and providing makeup for transgender women.

Helping transgender women with their transition was not something Gill Springgay had initially intended to do when she launched her image consultancy service.

But when a male friend unexpectedly asked her to do his makeup, she realised there was no image consultancy service for a person who was transgender. She changed her client focus and launched Makeover Girl Reinvent Yourself, working with males who are transitioning or have already transitioned.

Now, following 10 years of helping male clients make the first steps towards transitioning into a female, she has been nominated in the Positive Role Model category at the National Diversity Awards 2019.

Gill, who works from her studio at her Eccleston home, says: “I used to be a housing officer for Chorley Council and I got made redundant. I always had a vision to set up a makeover and image consultancy business as I have always been interested in hair and makeup ever since I was a little girl.

“I studied at night school and set up a website.“A male friend came to me and asked if I could do his makeup and make him look female. He came to my home and we had a talk about how he would looking terms of clothes, hair and makeup and. I was completely amazed at how feminine I could make him look. He was happy and I thought I had a talent for it. I saw the possibility of what I could do.”

Gill began seeking out transgender support groups and visited the Manchester Concord social group, offering demonstrations every month. She adds: “I have never had any female clients. I decided to focus on transgender women. There are a lot of people who need my help and I have lots of clients in transition.”

Gill’s work reaches beyond teaching about hair and makeup, as she helps her clients become more confident in their new look and accept who they are. She adds: “I go out shopping with my clients and quite often it is their first step out. “I give them the ability to see themselves as females, rather than a man in drag. They never thought they could look feminine until I teach them how. “I give my clients makeup tutorials and look at their body shape so I can tell them what clothes suit them. I do a colour analysis and as I stock wigs to suit their face shape and skin tone.”

Gill develops strong friendships with her clients and supports them through their transitional journey.She adds: “I am not a trained counsellor but I can support my clients as I listen to them and help them feel relaxed. In some cases, I am the first person they have told about transitioning.
“I have a few links with gender clinics and counsellors where I can signpost people to.

“Not everyone is in transition. Quite a lot of clients seem to be the same age – in their 40s, 50s and 60s – who are married and have had children. “They have struggled to keep their identity in and are scared to make the first step. “It is hard enough dealing with their image as they thought they were male and they are now presenting themselves as female. Even though the concept is more accepted in society, it is still terrifying for the person. But when they are fully dressed they feel more relaxed as their brain is telling them they are a woman.”

Gill has more than 100 clients from all over the UK and has people coming from as far as London, Ireland and Scotland. She has also written various magazine articles on the subject and was poised to take part in a Channel Four documentary until her client no longer wished to take part.

Gill, who has two daughters aged 14 and 12, says: “I was the first image consultant exclusively for transgender women and I offer a specialist service so I have clients from quite far. I have links to a local B&B so people can stay overnight. I had Channel Four filming in my home as part of The Making Of Me. I was supposed to be on episode four but my client pulled out so we didn’t get aired.

“I have been lucky enough to have been invited several times to judge Miss Transliving in Eastbourne and Miss Rose Pageant in Scarborough, donating prizes and offering my sponsorship. I also attended the Beaumont Society Harrogate events for several years offering my services and sponsorship. I also voluntarily wrote regular fashion and beauty articles for their magazine. My service has grown and grown, so much so I have been mentored by Virgin, who is helping me upgrade my website and promote my business. I have been asked to represent them via their Virgin.com website, as they are big advocates of diversity.”

Part of Gill’s aim is to educate people about transgender and make the notion more accepted.
She adds: “My aim is to break down barriers and show it is normal. People who are transgender are no different to anybody else.”

Gill now needs your votes to be shortlisted for the next stage of the National Diversity Awards 2019, which take place at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on September 20.
To vote, visit www.nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate. Voting closes May 31 and the shortlisted nominees will be announced soon after that.

Source – Written by Natalie Walker as featured in The Lancashire Post  – https://www.lep.co.uk/news/people/how-eccleston-mum-has-been-helping-to-style-and-inspire-transgender-women-through-her-makeover-girl-reinvent-yourself-image-consultancy-1-9786731

YORK charity Accessible Arts & Media is in the running for a National Diversity Award 2019.

Based at Sanderson House, Bramham Road, Chapelfields, the charity has been nominated in the Community Organisation category.

Kelly Langford, project manager and marketing coordinator, said: “These awards celebrate the excellent achievements of grassroots communities that tackle the issues in today’s society, giving them recognition for their dedication and hard work,so it’s a real honour for us to have been nominated.”

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral will play host to the awards ceremony on September 20, when “Britain’s most inspirational and selfless people will come together to honour the rich tapestry of our nation”, recognising nominees in their respective fields of diversity, whether age, disability, gender, race, faith, religion and sexual orientation.

Accessible Arts & Media (AAM)has been running inclusive arts and media learning programmes in and around York since 1982. At present the focus is on projects for learning disabled young people and adults, older people living with dementia and memory loss and people with mental ill health, with the aim of helping people to develop the skills and confidence to become involved in their community and have more of a say in what matters to them.

Creative director Rose Kent said: “We’re incredibly proud that our work’s been recognised with a nomination for a National Diversity Award. The awards are all about celebrating inclusion and diversity, which is what we do every day at AAM. We believe that everyone can learn, everyone can be creative, and everyone can contribute to their local community; they just need the right support. It would mean the world to us to win the award and put York on the map as an inclusive city.”

The National Diversity Awards receive more than 25,000 nominations and votes annually. Nominations for who should win are now open and will close on May 31; shortlisted nominees will be announced in June. The judging panel will take the number of nominations received for each nominee into account when making its decision. “Don’t miss out on your chance to get involved and support Accessible Arts & Media,” urged Rose.

To nominate Accessible Arts & Media and explain why you think they should win an award, visit nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate/23007 or email emma@nationaldiversityawards.co.uk for a nomination form.

Source – Written by Charles Hutchinson as featured in The York Press – https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/17653916.york-charity-accessible-arts-nominated-for-national-diversity-award/

Autism, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia to name but a few. They’re all conditions we’ve heard of, but there’s now a word to describe them all.

‘Neurodiversity’ refers to the different ways the brain can work and interpret information.

According to the Department of Education, 15% of students in the UK have a what’s called ‘learning difference’, and now a 16-year old girl wants to honour them all – with the creation of ‘Neurodiversity Celebration Week’.

Many neurodivergent adults look back on their school days in a negative light. They spent much of their time at school feeling embarrassed and humiliated. Speaking to ITV News, Siena Castellon says often students with neurodiversities are made to feel like failures.

She says their ability to fulfil their potential is threatened by the stigma associated with having an educational need, and the misconceptions many people still have about those with a learning difference.

Siena is on a mission to break down those barriers.

She’s set up a website dedicated to the inaugural week, and so far almost 300 schools across the UK have pledged their support.

They will either organise lessons to educate the wider student population about Neurodiversity, or will hang up posters around their schools to raise awareness.

The idea for the week came up after Siena found comfort in Anti-Bullying Week. She’d been bullied at school for having a number of learning differences.

Just like the national Anti-Bullying Week, she wanted Neurodiversity to have the same platform.

Being neurodivergent includes having ADHD, Autism and Dyslexia and more.

All forms of neurodivergence bring strengths as well as difficulties. The creation of this week hopes to celebrate those strengths.

“In order to help us to flourish, I believe schools should stop focusing only on what we cannot do and should begin to acknowledge and celebrate the many positive aspects of being neurodiverse.“It is important for schools to recognise our many strengths: our creativity, innovation, ability to think outside-the-box, problem-solving skills, unique insights and perspectives, perseverance and resilience.”– SIENA CASTELLON, FOUNDER

 

Arundel resident Charlotte Twinley, 21, has been nominated for a Positive Role Model for disabilities at the National Diversity Awards. Charlotte was diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) when she was 15 years old. EDS is a connective tissue disorder, affecting all of the collagen in the body which supports joints, muscles and organs. This caused her to have severe digestive complications. This greatly affected her life, causing her to stop being able to take part in sports. This all led her to develop anxiety, depression and anorexia.

Soon after, Charlotte had to leave university, and have a completely liquid diet for a year, until she had surgery to get a stoma bag. Now Charlotte uses social media and the internet to help others who are going through similar problems, spread awareness and end the stigma towards stomas, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and mental health problems.

Charlotte said: “Now, less than a year into having my stoma, I’m able to go out and eat and, what’s even more important, I want to eat and finally fully appreciate food again. I finally feel comfortable in my own skin. I’m raising awareness for EDS and chronic illness and helping those who are in a similar situation as I was as much as I can on Instagram.

I worked with Barcroft TV to produce a video on YouTube and Snapchat about EDS and my ileostomy – highlighting the fact that it’s not just people with cancer, crohns and colitis that have a stoma. The YouTube video has over 203,000 views and I received 60+ messages on social media about my video after it was released on Snapchat, all of which I replied to. I’m taking part and modelling for campaigns about body image and health conditions, like a campaign organised by Love Disfigure and NuNude outside of Victoria’s Secret for more inclusivity – this became viral with Huffpost, LadBible, Daily Mail and People writing articles about it, as well as many others around the world.

In January 2019, I was part of an article in Glamour Paris talking about how I raise awareness for stomas on Instagram. I have also set up my own website, sharing my story and have started to blog about various topics; such as diversity, disabilities and mental health. I’m dedicated to raise awareness for mental health, for eating disorders, for body dysmorphia, for body confidence, for diversity and for encouraging people to love and accept their bodies the way they are. I want to be the girl I needed to see when I was struggling. I want to be the best role model I can be.”

If you would like to vote for Charlotte for you can do so herehttps://nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate/22295/

You can also follow her on her blog and Instagram.

Source – www . Sussex Local . Net

A man from Surbiton who defied the odds to recover from a late diagnosis of HIV and go on to fight for disability rights has been nominated for a national award.

Roland Chesters, who was given just two weeks to live at the time of his diagnosis, has suffered long term effects on his brain and motor skills because the virus was picked up and treated at a late stage.

He has overcome post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic ill health and discrimination to bring greater disability rights to the workplace and tackle the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS.

Now Roland’s work has been recognised by The National Diversity Awards (NDA), whose supporters include Graham Norton, Katie Piperand Adam Hills.

Roland, who works as a disability development consultant at Luminate, said: “I am delighted to be nominated for such a prestigious award and hope it will raise awareness of the hidden disability that is HIV and AIDs.

“There is still a fear and ignorance about HIV, which puts people off getting tested. I want to spread the message that those on medication are undetectable and cannot pass it on.”

The NDA are the UK’s largest diversity awards, which recognises inspirational people in fields of diversity including age, disability, gender, race, faith, religion and sexual orientation.

Sir Lenny Henry CBE, a previously shortlisted nominee for the Celebrity of the Year gong said: “Diversity to me means involving everybody without any discrimination; its means having integrated groups in society, it means fairness and total inclusion and that’s what the National Diversity Awards are about. Congratulations to everyone who has been nominated, you’re all doing a fantastic job, rock on!”

Roland, 59, became a chair for the disabled staff network at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, where he previously worked as a language-testing specialist. He introduced a change of policy – enabling disabled staff to no longer have to regularly change jobs.

The Royal Holloway University of London graduate helps employers in various industries to create an inclusive workforce and for their employees to develop confidence in their role.

Roland supports a number of charities and community projects, such as the Terrence Higgins’ Trust Positive Voices, where he speaks about HIV at schools, colleges and workplaces in order to tackle existing stereotypes.

He has volunteered as a mentor withPositively UK, a charity which offers peer-led support. During this time, he has supported people who have been ostracised and attacked after they ‘came out’ with their diagnosis

One man, who was sexually assaulted and cannot be named for legal reasons, was afraid to leave his home until he worked with Roland.

The man has nominated Roland for the award, saying: “Roland took me under his wing and helped me to conquer my fears as I use to lock myself indoors. Roland helps me say ‘I have HIV.”

Roland, who was diagnosed in 2006, has also sat on a number of boards, including the National Long Term Survivors Group (NLTSG), which supports HIV Positive people, and the London AIDS Memorial Campaign and Disability Rights UK – where at the time he was the only gay, disabled person on the board.

Roland has widely shared his own story in order to break-down barriers. In 2018 he published Ripples from the Edge of Life, which is both a memoir and self-help book.

Roland, who continues to speak out at events and in the press, said: “I will not live in fear. I want to stand up for other people who may be more vulnerable or with less of a support network”.

“Until there are enough people living with the condition saying ‘this is who I am and I cannot pass on the infection the stigma will not go away.”

Roland lives with his partner, Richard, in Surbiton, Surrey. He enjoys opera, classical music, theatre and fashion.

The NDA receives over 25,000 nominations and votes each year. Founder and CEO Paul Sesay said: “We look to those who represent progress, spirit and resilience and I cannot wait to learn about the wonderful work being carried out this year.”

You can vote for Roland until May 31.

To vote online, click here:

Source : www . Gscene . com

Young champion fundraiser Louis Johnson has been named as one of Birmingham Children’s Hospital Charity’s Hundred Heroes.

Twelve-year-old Louis has so far raised more than £6,000 for Birmingham Children’s Hospital in support of children being cared for at the hospital.

Louis, who lives in Tettenhall Wood, said he was really excited to learn he had been named as one of the charity’s Hundred Heroes – which recognises individuals who support the charity.

Louis, who is a pupil at Smestow School, said: “I was really excited and happy to learn that I have been told I am one of Birmingham Children’s Hospital Charity’s Hundred Heroes. I was completely over the moon.

“I have raised more than £6,000 for the charity now and so far have raised £600 for them through my upcoming walk.”

Serena Daw, public fundraising manager at Birmingham Children’s Hospital Charity, added: “We are thrilled to announce Louis as one of our Hundred Heroes. These awards are an opportunity for us to celebrate and thank our supporters for their extraordinary efforts over the past year, and Louis is fully deserving of this recognition.

“To date, Louis has raised over £6,000 for us and has been so passionate about supporting our sick kids. From tea parties to charity walks, he is always looking at new ways to fundraise. He truly is a hero – well done Louis.”

On Saturday Louis will be walking 15 miles in a fancy dress costume to Birmingham Children’s Hospital, from Tettenhall, in a bid to raise more funds for the charity. When he reaches the hospital, he will give teddy bears and colouring books to the young patients.

He will then return to Wolverhampton by train before collecting money in the city centre’s Queen Square.

In eight years of fundraising, since he was five years old, Louis has raised nearly £20,000 for a variety of local charities.

Louis has also been nominated for a Positive Role Model Award at the 2019 National Diversity Awards!

 

Source – www . Express and Star . com

Louis Johnson, 12, from Tettenhall Wood, has been nominated in the positive role model (age) category in the national awards.

The prestigious awards recognises nominees in their respective fields of diversity, including age, disability, gender, race, faith, religion and sexual orientation.

In eight years of fundraising, since he was five years old, he has raised nearly £20,000 for local charities.

Last year alone, the Smestow School pupil raised nearly £6,000 for Birmingham Children’s Hospital.

In his nomination, Louis said: “Just being nominated means a lot, it is not about winning to me it is about others seeing what I do and awareness of charities I support.

“Just making a difference is all it takes.”

Last year Louis was named as one of two child ambassadors for the British Citizen Youth Awards. He also was awarded the Duncan Edwards Good Citizen Awards and a Certificate of Excellence from the Mayor of Wolverhampton.

His next fundraising challenge will see him undertake a 15-mile walk from Tettenhall to Birmingham Children’s Hospital, and back, in fancy dress, on April 20. When he reaches the hospital, Louis will be donating teddy bears and colouring books to children being treated there.

Nominations and voting for the National Diversity Awards close on May 31 and a shortlist of nominees will be announced shortly after. An awards ceremony will take place in September.

To vote for Louis, visit www.nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate/21022.

Source – www . Express and Star . com

Two West Yorkshire Police employees have been nominated in the national Control Room Awards 2019.

The awards are due to take place this Thursday (7 March) at the De Vere Orchard Hotel in Nottingham.

Chief Inspector Nick Rook has been nominated for the award for Services to the Public and police staff member Eddie McEvoy is nominated in the Special Recognition for Bravery and Courage category.

Chief Inspector Rook is one of only a handful of registered sight impaired officers in the UK and has previously been nominated in the National Diversity Awards and European Diversity Awards for his work as a role model for other disabled police employees.

He has been a serving police officer for 20 years but four years ago suffered health complications which resulted in him losing nearly all his sight in his right eye. Since then he has suffered complications with his left eye, also affecting his vision. He was determined to retain his current position in the Force Communications Department and is now using specialist equipment to ensure he can still work effectively.

Chief Inspector Rook returned to work as soon as he could after losing sight in his right eye and since then has assisted with rebranding and setting up the first operations centre for the National Police Air Service, designed a new shift pattern which reduced sickness levels and brought in a replacement command and control system which saved the Force thousands of pounds.

He is also an executive member of the West Yorkshire Police Disability Association, a role in which he engages with others and tries to break down disability barriers.

Chief Inspector Rook said: “It is humbling to receive such recognitions. What I am really pleased about, especially taking into account Eddie’s nomination, is that these awards shine the spotlight on the hard work my colleagues in Contact Management do every day behind the scenes.”

Police staff member Eddie McEvoy, who works as an Initial Contact Officer in the Force Communications Department, has been nominated for talking a potentially suicidal male off a bridge. He was off-duty at the time of the incident in January 2018.

Being an experienced call handler, Eddie was aware of the potential risks to himself of approaching an individual with mental health issues who was in crisis. However, he took the decision to stop at the scene, talked the male away from the barrier and walked with him off the bridge.

This is the second year in a row that Eddie has been nominated for a Control Room Award.

Senior Contact manager Tom Donohoe said: “The APD Control Room awards are an important way to recognise those staff who work tirelessly and with dedication and commitment, but are not always in the public eye.

“I am delighted that for the second year running West Yorkshire Police have been nominated. It’s great to be in company with unsung heroes from other police forces, the fire service and smbulance service.

“These awards are a great way to recognise all the work that these staff do, day in and day out.”

Source – West Yorkshire Police

Sajid Rashid BEM has won the ‘One to Watch’ award at the seventh annual British Muslim Awards.

A Burton-on-Trent philanthropist has won the ‘One to Watch’ award at the seventh annual British Muslim Awards.

Sajid Rashid BEM is regarded as one of Britain’s most inspirational figures scooping many of the UK’s top national accolades including The National Diversity Awards & JCI UK’s Ten Outstanding Young Person (TOYP) awards.

“It’s an honour and privilege to accept this award. Firstly I would like to thank the Lord almighty for

everything he has blessed me with and congratulations to all the finalists and winners, win or lose, in my eyes you are all winners. It people such as yourselves that put the ‘Great’ back into Great Britain,” said Sajid.

The awards were held at the Bradford Hotel with more than 300 of the most remarkable British Muslims shortlisted as finalists.

The awards were held to recognise a wide range of achievements from outstanding Muslim individuals across the UK who positively impact business, charity, sport, arts, culture, religious advocacy, education and medicine among others, and simultaneously and unknowingly battle negative stereotypes every day.

The awards endeavour to showcase the strength of the British Muslim community, the impact it has on culture and its achievements over the last year as well as highlighting the significant role Muslims play in contributing to a better Britain.

Irfan Younis, CEO of Oceanic Consulting said: “I’d like to congratulate all the winners and every finalist from the seventh British Muslim Awards 2019. Every year I think we’ve seen the best the British Muslim community has to offer but every year I’m blown away by just how special the talent is and just how hard people work to service their communities. I already look forward to seeing what next year has to offer; I have no doubt that the Muslim community will continue to thrive and act as leaders for future generations to come.”

Source – www . Derby Telegraph . co . uk

 

“I didn’t think people like me would be allowed into Canary Wharf, let alone work there!” When you know that children feel this way, how do you walk away?

Those are the words of Nilesh B. Dosa, a finance professional at EY (Ernst & Young) and founder of ‘icanyoucantoo’, an organisation focused on creating better future work prospects and outcomes for non-privileged youngsters, a topic which he resonates with from personal experience.

Nilesh’s parents are from Tanzania and India and he grew up in a one-bedroom council flat in Newham where he did his schooling. As is often the case with immigrant children, the passion shared by his family to make the most of the potential and opportunity before them, meant Nilesh graduated with a first-class degree in finance; completed his chartered accountancy training at a Big-4 firm; worked in banking and then joined EY in 2014.

So far, so good, and indeed it is not a hugely uncommon story compared to others who have battled against the odds of their upbringing to achieve great things. However, Nilesh was diagnosed at birth, with a neurodegenerative condition called Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) Disease. This meant, he grew up knowing that, whilst the symptoms hadn’t yet permeated his everyday life, he was a ticking time bomb who needed to fulfil his meaning, purpose, and potential to impact society.

Living With A Degenerative Disease 

CMT is a hereditary muscle-wasting condition which currently has no cure or medication. The condition, which has worsened over time, leads to patients suffering from constant pain and also experiencing ‘neurological fatigue’ – “days when getting out of bed genuinely feels impossible,” Nilesh explained to me.

“Whilst I was born with it, it’s only in the past three years, I’ve felt a significant deterioration in my condition, with both chronic pain and fatigue a daily feature”, he explains.

As a result of the deterioration in his physical health he also experienced a period of depression –  where he sought counselling and psychiatric support. This was due to a “multitude of reasons”, he explained, centred primarily with “worries about the future.”

“How quickly will my health deteriorate? Who will take care of my family and what legacy will I leave for them and the community? It was these big questions that, whilst not welcome at the time, caused a step change in his thinking that inevitably led to a more fulfilling path for his community.

“I have always been inherently dissatisfied – he explained. “I want to do as much as I can before my health begins to prevent me from making the impact that I desire! So, in January 2018, I took a 40% pay cut, went part-time at EY and created the capacity I needed to do more for the causes I love.”

I Can, You Can Too.

Nilesh has always had an overriding passion for supporting children and young people – an area he has volunteered in for almost the past two decades. Before creating ‘icanyoucantoo’ in 2016, he spent 10+ years volunteering with the global grassroots charity Swadhyay – empowering young people, through community-based projects, to foster social responsibility in their own lives. His aspiration had always been to facilitate social mobility and level the playing field for young people.

Having grown up in a deprived part of London himself, he understood first-hand the challenges faced by many children, young adults and their families. And so ‘icanyoucantoo’ was  born out of a frustration, a lived experience and a hunger to change things – because “it is unacceptable as it currently stands.”

Every child has a dream

“I fundamentally believe that every child has a dream – this is their birth right”, Nilesh tells me. However, as he explained, for too many, these don’t materialise not because of inability or inaptitude, but because of a postcode; an environment not conducive to aspiration, to achievement, to greatness.

“This is a modern-day tragedy!” he exclaims in a grandiose fashion that demonstrates how deeply his passion on the topic shines through. “These are limiting beliefs that I simply cannot accept. How do I look my own daughter, Mahi, in the eyes, knowing that this phenomenon exists on our doorstep!?”

Impacting Futures

Nilesh believes that not only what he is doing is different, but how he is doing it. From the very beginning his intention has been to create an initiative that was different to other corporate outreach programmes.

Traditionally, many companies deliver expert presentations on how to obtain a job at a top firm delivered by very slick, very inspiring speakers, but they don’t take it further – and this is where the real barrier lies. Nilesh explains “this programme isn’t about one-off presentations and interventions – we work withthe youngsters regularly and methodically to ensure that they imbibe the skills that will serve them in the future”.

“I am absolutely outcomes focussed”, he explains. The young and disenfranchised who once believed things like “I will never get to work at a company in Canary Wharf” are now working at EY, just like him. Others who were going to “find some 9-5 job” after college have gone on to university. “The children I work with, and their families, have become friends. I have been to their homes and shared a meal with their families and been to their place of worship and prayed with them”.

Outcomes

“So, what about outcomes thus far?” I ask, to the self-confessed outcome oriented community builder.

  • 30% of icanyoucantoo students have gained employment or secured an apprenticeship at a number of top-flight companies including EY, Deloitte, UBS, JP Morgan and Allen & Overy.
  • 70% of icanyoucantoo students have gone on to further education – studying accountancy, finance, law, medicine or the social sciences.
  • 100% of icanyoucantoo students fed back that their involvement in this initiative contributed to helping them decide what they wanted to do next.

Inspiring stuff indeed, and certainly a thought-provoking example of how others can serve their communities with a view to creating impact on the future careers of those around them.

Source – www . Forbes . com

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