A TRANS rights defender has been nominated for a prestigious award in recognition of her work promoting positive attitudes to diversity.

Ellie Lowther has been shortlisted for the Positive Role Model Award for LGBT at the National Diversity Awards (NDA).

In 2012 Ellie came out as a binary trans woman and, after realising there was a lack of inclusive service for the trans community, decided to dedicate herself to providing that support network.

She shortly set up Cleveland Transgender Association and in 2017 founded the charity Trans Aware – the first trans-specific registered charity in the North-East which has now helped over 300 people.

Ellie currently holds many positions in local and national schemes aimed at spreading diversity such as Our House Project, via 2020group, in the Teesside area which provides a safe living space for those who identify as trans.

She also helps write policies such as the trans inclusion framework – used by schools in the Stockton-on-Tees area and for Cleveland Police to aid those coming out as trans within the force.

The social rights promoter also creates and delivers workshops for organisations throughout the UK and travels the country delivering programmes to young people via National Citizen Service.

Ellie will be attending the NDA awards night, held at Liverpool’s cathedral, in September, and said she was blown away when she received the nomination.

She said: “When I heard about the shortlist I was shocked.

“Just to realise my work is being recognised and counts for something, it’s amazing. I’m really pleased to be on the shortlist.

“I know everyone that has been shortlisted and they’re all amazing people who have done amazing things so it’s fantastic company to be in.

“I’m very much looking forward to it.”

Ellie’s main line of work consists of raising awareness of trans rights amongst young people, increasing diversity in community organisations, and promoting the global trans movement online.

She said she wants to continue promoting awareness to help enable people to feel comfortable in themselves.

She added: “I have always been a community type of person but this is my work.

“I’m out there doing it every day and I love what I do because I’m able to spread that awareness.

“I want to help create a world that allows people to be who they are.

“It’s all about empowering people to be themselves because that’s when they are at their best and that’s when they can achieve what they set out to do.”

Source – The Northern Echo

A Teenager from Widnes who has raised more than £30,000 for charity is shortlisted for a prestigious National Diversity Award.

Aidan Jackson, 17, started his fundraising work more than four years ago and is in the running for a positive role model award for age.

On his nomination, Aidan said: “I am totally shocked, surprised and honoured to have been shortlisted for this amazing award.

“I want to thank every single person who nominated me and those that support my fundraising as without their support I wouldn’t be in this position now.”

He started fundraising after close friend Olivia Walker passed away in 2014. Her family set up a foundation in her memory The Olivia Alice Foundation.

His many challenges in that time include a Mile of pennies, sponsored walk, swimming the distance of the English Channel Crossing in a pool, raffles, car boot sales and craft stalls.

He even filled the local rugby stadium with 10,900 teddy bears before sending the teddy bears off to help children around the world with an organisation called Bearlyloved.org

He also collected sleeping bags, coats, warm clothing and toiletries for the homeless in Liverpool and then distributed them of an evening over a couple of weeks.

I hold an annual Christmas Carol Concert Fundraiser for the community in the garden at my home.

He is currently raising funds for community defibrillators and since August last year I has managed to buy five community defibrillators and am now on to raising enough funds for community defibrillator number 6, which will be installed at Halton Haven Day Hospice in Runcorn.

On his charitable work, he said: “I don’t always find my fundraising easy as due to my age and Aspergers, ADHD along with problems with my legs.

“I don’t let this deter me and have been in situations that many of my peers haven’t had the opportunity of.

“I have recently been ill in hospital but I am determined to continue to help as many people as I possibly can.”

HSBC, Direct Line Group & MI5 have recently been announced as sponsors of the pioneering awards that have paid tribute to over 700 grass root charities and diversity champions since its inception. Joining the likes of Auto Trader UK & Morgan Sindall Construction & Infrastructure, ITV News are also listed amongst a host of companies showcasing their support to recognising diverse talent.

An MI5 spokesperson said: “It is MI5’s mission to keep the country safe and it’s vital that we represent the diverse society we seek to protect.

“We are at our strongest when we have the richest mix of the best talent, working together in an environment that allows people to thrive. Put simply, our diverse workforce is crucial to our operational successes.

“We are pleased to be able to demonstrate our ongoing commitment to inclusion through our continued support for these awards.

“They are an important way of recognising and celebrating the good work being done across the country to promote inclusivity, diversity and provide opportunity for all.”

Designed to highlight the country’s most inspirational and selfless people,

The National Diversity Awards are endorsed by high profile figures such as Stephen Fry, Sir Lenny Henry CBE and Graham Norton.

More than 28,000 people were nominated this year alone, with an astonishing 124 nominees being recognised for their various achievements nationwide.

The winners will be revealed during a ceremony at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on September 20.

Amongst those being honoured are a reformed gangster, a Junior Bake Off Star and a host of campaigners and activists, all of whom work tirelessly to combat injustice and discrimination in very different ways.

Actress and comedian Sally Phillips will host the event.

She said: “Acknowledging and celebrating the hard work and stand out achievements of role models and community groups throughout the UK is a genuine honour for me.

“Having attended the Awards back in 2016, I experienced this fabulous ceremony first hand and I cannot wait to be back this year celebrating the dedication and commitment of some of the UK’s most luminous and exceptional people.”

Paul Sesay, founder and chief executive of the National Diversity Awards, added “A record amount of nominations and votes were received this year, the most we have ever received.

“Congratulations to all of our shortlisted nominees, it is a privilege to recognise your bravery, resilience and courage and I am honoured to share this with the nation.

“I look forward to congratulating you in person in September”.

To see the full list of nominees, visit

www.nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/shortlist

Source – www . Runcorn and Widnes World . co . uk

Jenni Pettican has been shortlisted for the UK’ Largest Diversity Awards

Jenni Pettican from Corringham, Essex has been shortlisted for the Positive Role Model for Disability at the National Diversity Awards 2019.
Over 28,000 people nominated this year alone and the results are finally in for the National Diversity Awards (NDA), with an astonishing 124 nominees being recognised for their various achievements nationwide.

Community organisations and role models from across the UK will head to the breath-taking Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on 20th September to witness the countries 2019 winners being crowned the best of British diversity.

Amongst those being honoured are a reformed gangster, a Junior Bake Off Star and a host of campaigners and activists, all of whom work tirelessly to combat injustice and discrimination in very different ways.

Jenni was diagnosed with connective tissue disorder, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome in 2016. She also has a form of Dysautonomia called Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and suffered with a CSF leak which took 4 surgeries to diagnose and fix in 2017.

After struggling to find answers to her seemingly unrelated symptoms Jenni left university in 2015 in search of a diagnosis. She returned in 2017 and this summer will be graduating with first class honours from the university of East Anglia. She began to document her journey with her conditions online in 2017 and shares weekly videos of daily life with her conditions in the hopes of helping others and making them feel less alone. She also makes regular awareness videos to share knowledge about these little-known conditions with sufferers, the general public, and the medical community. You can find Jenni’s YouTube channel at Youtube.com/c/chronicallyjenni

On being nominated for the award Jenni said:
‘It’s been completely overwhelming. I got my first proper job interview, found out I’d achieved a first in my degree and that I’d been shortlisted for a national award all in the same week! I can’t believe that something I made to help as many people as I can in my tiny corner of the internet is being recognised on a national level. I’m so grateful to everyone who nominated me their words were so beautiful and made my heart so full; I hope I can do them proud. The other nominees look amazing and I’m very excited for the ceremony in September.’

HSBC, Direct Line Group & MI5 have recently been announced as sponsors of the pioneering awards that have paid tribute to over 700 grass root charities and diversity champions since its inception. Joining the likes of Auto Trader UK & Morgan Sindall Construction & Infrastructure, ITV News are also listed amongst a host of companies showcasing their support to recognising diverse talent.

A spokesperson for MI5 said;
“It is MI5’s mission to keep the country safe, and it’s vital that we represent the diverse society we seek to protect. We are at our strongest when we have the richest mix of the best talent, working together in an environment that allows people to thrive. Put simply, our diverse workforce is crucial to our operational successes. We are pleased to be able to demonstrate our ongoing commitment to inclusion through our continued support for these awards. They are an important way of recognising and celebrating the good work being done across the country to promote inclusivity, diversity and provide opportunity for all.”
Designed to highlight the country’s most inspirational and selfless people, the NDA’s continue to gain endorsements from high profile figures such as Stephen Fry, Sir Lenny Henry CBE and Graham Norton. Actress and comedian Sally Phillips will take centre stage on 20th September as the official host of this year’s ceremony.

Reflecting on the forthcoming celebrations, Sally said;
“I am delighted to be hosting the 2019 National Diversity Awards. Acknowledging and celebrating the hard work and stand out achievements of role models and community groups throughout the UK is a genuine honour for me. Having attended the Awards back in 2016, I experienced this fabulous ceremony first hand and I cannot wait to be back this year celebrating the dedication and commitment of some of the UK’s most luminous and exceptional people.”

Previous winners include actor Warwick Davis, footballs equality and inclusion organisation Kick It Out and freedom fighter Abbey Kiwanuka. Paul Sesay, Founder and CEO of the National Diversity Awards added “A record amount of nominations and votes were received this year, the most we have ever received. I know our judging panel had an incredibly difficult task of whittling down the nominees to create an outstanding shortlist. “So many heartfelt testimonies really showcased how these people and organisations are having a profound impact on the lives of others, and I applaud them for their dedication to each specific cause.
Congratulations to all of our shortlisted nominees, it is a privilege to recognise your bravery,
resilience and courage and I am honoured to share this with the nation. I look forward to congratulating you in person in September”.

To view a full list of nominees please visit www.nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/shortlist

Source – www . Yourthurock . com

Cheryl Robson, the founder and publisher of Aurora Metro Books, has been shortlisted for a Lifetime Achiever Award at the National Diversity Awards.

The awards, held at Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral on 20th September, honour positive role models, entrepreneurs and community organisations.

Robson has been nominated in recognition of her 30-year career publishing drama, fiction and non-fiction that celebrates marginalised voices.

She first founded the Women Writers Workshop in 1989, which led to the creation of her press. It now has an extensive catalogue of titles focused on women, LGBTQ and BAME writers or subjects. Aurora Metro’s Virginia Prize for Fiction, dedicated to unpublished novels for adults or YA readers, written by women, is currently open for submissions. Robson is also campaigning and raising funds to erect a statue of Virginia Woolf in Richmond-on-Thames where the writer lived with her husband Leonard.

Robson said: “I was thrilled to have been acknowledged by the publishing industry with an IPG nomination earlier this year, and being recognised by the National Diversity Awards, where the competition is even tougher, means a great deal. We have built a very diverse list of amazing authors from more than 20 countries, and we’re always looking for strong, original voices.”

In the last year, the indie press has bagged an IPG nomination and a Pen Translates Award for Gabi Reigh’s work on classic Romanian novel by Milhail Sebastian, The Town with Acacia Trees, to be published by Aurora Metro in the autumn. This month, Chris Woodley’s Next Lesson was longlisted in the Polari First Book Prize.

Robson joins seven other nominees including sports editor Rodney Hinds on the shortlist.

Source – www . The Book Seller . com

Big Issue ambassador Sabrina Cohen-Hatton has been shortlisted for a National Diversity Award after the story of her remarkable rise captured the imagination of the nation.

The inspirational 36-year-old featured on the cover of The Big Issue magazine telling her story of how she went from selling the magazine as a teenager to becoming one of the country’s most senior female firefighters.

Cohen-Hatton was in charge of the fire service’s response to 2017 London terror attacks in Finsbury Park and Westminster and is also a prize-winning academic.

She chronicled her incredible life in the book The Heat of the Moment: Life and Death Decision-Making from a Firefighter and became an ambassador for The Big Issue earlier this year, greeting vendors at a House of Lords reception.

Now, her incredible work has been recognised with a National Diversity Awards nomination in the Positive Role Model Award for Gender category and she will find out if she is a winner at the ceremony in Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on September 20.

A delighted Cohen-Hatton said: “This is so fantastic! Thank you so much to everyone who took the time to nominate and vote.

“I’m really humbled, very excited and completely touched. Thank you so much.”

Cohe-Hatton will be among 124 nominees to reach the final stages, which will be presented by actor and comedian Sally Phillips, after more than 28,000 people were put forward for consideration.

Previous award winners include actor Warwick Davis, football’s equality and inclusion organisation Kick It Out and freedom fighter Abbey Kiwanuka.

Paul Sesay, founder and CEO of the National Diversity Awards, said: “A record amount of nominations and votes were received this year, the most we have ever received. I know our judging panel had an incredibly difficult task of whittling down the nominees to create an outstanding shortlist.

“Congratulations to all of our shortlisted nominees, it is a privilege to recognise your bravery, resilience and courage and I am honoured to share this with the nation. I look forward to congratulating you in person in September.”

Source – www . Big issue . com

Our founder, Edwina Dunn OBE, has been nominated for the Positive Role Model Award at The National Diversity Awards an award ceremony that celebrates the outstanding achievements of diverse heroes and life-changing charities for their exceptional fight against inequality.

As well as being the founder of our charity, The Female Lead, Edwina is also the co-founder of the international data science company dunnhumby, a business she launched in 1989 from her kitchen table. She was responsible for launching Clubcard for Tesco which was the first mass customisation loyalty programme in the world and resulted in Tesco doubling its market share in less than 3 years. Edwina is passionate about seeing more girls go into STEM careers and showcases inspirational role models through The Female Lead.

“I am truly honoured to be nominated for the positive role model award. Congratulations to everyone who has been nominated and I cannot wait to learn more about the wonderful work you’re all doing”

As a team, we’re proud to see Edwina being recognized for all of her efforts working in schools promoting diversity and providing role models for young women. Over the last decade, Edwina has spearheaded various campaigns including chairing ‘Your Life’, a Government-backed campaign to encourage more young people to consider careers in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) industries.

Edwina Dunn believes that every great story about a woman is worth telling especially if it inspires a girl to follow her lead. Today, we want to share Edwina’s story with you to highlight what an exceptional role model she has been for us and girls everywhere.

Thank you for all of your support!

The Female Lead Team

Source – The Female Lead . com

Nominations have now closed for The UK’s largest diversity awards as judges begin preparing to announce this year’s shortlist.

The National Diversity Awards have been inundated with inspirational messages from across the nation, praising diversity heroes, entrepreneurs and community organisations.

With nominees waiting patiently to see who will be crowned the best of British diversity, organizers recently caught up with last year’s winners to see how receiving their accolade has affected their lives.

“Winning the N.D.A is the single most gratifying moment of my life” Said Rachael Pearson, winner of the Positive Role Model Award for Gender.

Founder of autism isolation no more, Rachael converted her home into a sensory space for children and parents, providing access to all the sensory equipment they could possibly need.

“It’s made me so proud and happy; I feel truly blessed to be part of such a towering beacon of diversity and inclusion for the nation. It’s given me an extra shot of get up and go for it. It’s fulfilled something in me that I wasn’t even aware I was missing”.

Echoing this sentiment, Rachel Jury, creator of the pioneering blog ‘Rocking2Stomas’ said “I cannot put into words what the National Diversity Awards night meant to me. I felt honoured to even be there amongst some amazing inspiration and brilliant people who have helped their communities in so many ways. The award represented hope and it felt like a win for the stoma community as a whole and another step in awareness”.

Rachel is an amazing young lady with a life-limiting condition which has resulted in her having two stoma bags – a Urostomy and an Ileostomy. She created her pioneering blog in January 2017 due to lack of online information and created a Facebook group called ‘Double Baggers Ostomy Support Group’, finally forming a place in the community to go for support.

The iconic awards have recently announced new supporters and returning sponsors such as MI5, Auto Trader UK & HSBC. The prestigious black-tie event has also attracted a growing list of endorsements from celebrities who are actively supporting the diversity agenda including Sir Lenny Henry, Graham Norton & and Adam Hills.

This year’s host Sally Phillips will take centre stage at the breathtaking cathedral on 20 th September as the UK’s most inspirational and selfless people will come together to honour the rich tapestry of our nation,

“I am delighted to be hosting the 2019 National Diversity Awards. Acknowledging and celebrating the hard work and stand out achievements of role models and community groups throughout the UK is a genuine honour for me. Having attended the Awards back in 2016, I experienced this fabulous ceremony first hand and I cannot wait to be back this year celebrating the dedication and commitment of some of the UK’s most luminous and exceptional people.”

With the ever-increasing need for cohesion between communities from all walks of life, the National Diversity Awards is sure to deliver this year’s grandest celebration of diversity.

Source – Able Magazine

A savvy 17-year-old has launched an all-natural range of Afro beauty products – after learning how to do her own hair when her mum was injured in accident.

Now the teenager is up for a National Diversity Award and wants to spread the word about her organic hair butters and raise awareness about young carers. Lucia became a young carer at 11-years-old.

She had just started secondary school and her mum broke her back in a serious car accident, leaving Lucia as the main carer for her mother and young brother. As well as taking on the house work and cooking, Lucia also had to learn how to care for her and her brother’s long Afro hair, she had no experience, but she quickly picked up the skills – and that blossomed into the beginnings of her business.

‘The hardest part was seeing my mum go from being such an active part of her community to being immobilised and pretty isolated,’ Lucia tells Metro.co.uk. ‘I think from that, as cheesy as it sounds, what I have learnt is that life is too short and to take every opportunity you can to be successful. ‘For so long I didn’t feel like I was doing anything but in hindsight I see that I do have such a different experience to my peers, which is why I feel strongly that there needs to be more awareness, so that young carers know they are special and get the support they deserve.’

Lucia started her business – Lucia Loves… – when she was 14. Now she has products in local shops in north London and has big dreams to expand before she finishes college. ‘My mum always took care of my hair. When she got injured, I had to learn to look after it myself literally overnight,’ explains Lucia. ‘I used to mix different products together to see what would work. I remember putting Cantu with oil and some shea moisture in the food blender, then putting it in a spray bottle.

I found it fun, but my mum was not impressed. ‘She bought me some raw ingredients like shea butter and cocoa butter, and I taught myself how to make these into a hair butter (while making a lot of mess), when clearing up, I realised that the hair butter made my skin feel nice too. I named it Melting Joy. ‘I then got the opportunity to sell products in a shop and my mum encouraged me to start my business doing what I was already doing with my products, she taught me about the importance of group economics and I now buy my ingredients and use stockists from other black-owned businesses as much as possible.’

For black and mixed-race women, hair is historically political. Western beauty standards make it incredibly difficult to embrace and celebrate natural Afro hair, and that is something that can be hard to unlearn.

‘To be honest, I have always wished my hair was softer and easier to manage because I found it annoying,’ says Lucia. ‘People always said to me I would look so much better if I straightened my hair but recently, especially since starting my business, I have seen so much positivity around natural Afro hair, which is good. ‘I feel actually proud of my hair.

When I see people with Afros I get excited and I really appreciate how much time and effort hair care takes. ‘My hair has lots of different curl patterns in it. The texture of my hair has changed so it’s always a learning process. ‘Of course, there is so much stigma around our hair type in society still. People think it’s unprofessional, I have been told my hair is a distraction and messy, when often that is not the case. ‘When we embrace our natural hair, we can be a part of reducing the stigma and by extension help alleviate the discrimination black and mixed women often face.’ Lucia is mixed-race and has struggled with discrimination and negative perceptions during her education – a lot of that stemmed from prejudice about her hair.

‘When I was in nursery, I remember girls saying I couldn’t play with them because I had to choose if I was black or white and I wasn’t either,’ says Lucia. ‘My mum remembers me asking her, at like three years old, why I didn’t have hair like hers – she showed me Alicia Keys and taught me that my hair was amazing.

‘All through school, teachers and my peers always made comments about my hair, they said it got in the way of the board, when I had corn rows they told me I looked like a boy, when I wore it out they said my hair was distracting. In both primary and secondary school, I was bullied. ‘I loved school and I enjoy learning, but I found it difficult to fit in.’ But this sense of alienation pushed Lucia to throw herself into her business – and she’s come a long way since she started out.

‘My whole range is natural and 100% certified organic. All of my packaging is environmentally sustainable and I encourage customers to return the jars and tins to be reused,’ says Lucia. ‘My products are all tested on myself and my family, never animals! None of my products or their ingredients are tested on animals as I have been a vegetarian all of my life.

‘I do not use water or preservatives either. They are made by someone who actually has experience with natural, Afro hair. Also, my business is just a regular person, facing regular challenges. For example, I have only just been able to start my re-branding now I am in college, so I have gained access to the computers and software that I need, as I couldn’t afford it myself.

‘Look out for my re-branded product labels on my social media in the next few months. ‘I hope to expand the Lucia Loves… brand into more than just hair products. ‘I want to make it about connecting with different communities who face challenges, for example I have started writing a book aimed at young people about what it means to be a young carer. “Being a Young Carer is…..”. ‘I am holding an event on 13th July called “Love Your Hair” aimed at parents with children who have Afro or curly hair, it’s about empowering children to embrace their curls and teaching parents and carers how to manage the curls naturally.

‘I love animation, I hope to study it at university and for this to be my career path. I hope to use animation as a medium to further connect with marginalised communities through positive representation.’

The National Diversity Awards receives over 28,000 nominations and votes annually, and Lucia is up for an award in her age category.
‘My advice for young entrepreneurs? Just don’t let anyone or anything stop you,’ says Lucia.

Source : The Metro Newspaper

A Surbiton man who defied a late HIV diagnosis and became a disability campaigner was nominated for a national award.

As the Surrey Comet previously reported earlier this year, Roland Chesters was given two weeks to live at the time of his HIV diagnosis, and suffered long term effects including brain damage because the virus was picked up and treated at such a late stage.

Nevertheless, he went on to defy the odds and continues to thrive as a campaigner for disabled rights.

His work in challenging the stigma surrounding HIV-AIDS has now been recognized by the The National Diversity Awards, after Mr Chesters was nominated for the prestigious award ahead of the presentation ceremony on Friday, September 20.

Mr Chesters spoke of his elation at receiving the nomination and hopes that it will further boost his efforts to combat misconceptions about the disease.

“I am delighted to be nominated for such a prestigious award and hope it will raise awareness of the hidden disability that is HIV and AIDs,” he said.

One key area of focus in the Surbiton man’s efforts has been encouraging people to get tested for HIV-AIDS.

The government’s annual report on the disease has found nearly half of those diagnosed in the UK are at the late stage of infection.

Mr Chesters now works as a consultant at disability support network Luminate, and previously chaired the disabled staff network at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

He was nominated for the award by an HIV-positive man who was sexually assaulted and cannot be named for legal reasons.

Remaining anonymous, the man praised Mr Chesters for helping him conquer his own anxiety about the disease.

“Roland took me under his wing and helped me to conquer my fears as I use to lock myself indoors.

“Roland helps me say ‘I have HIV’,” he said.

Meanwhile, Mr Chesters continues to work and campaign for disability rights and an end to stigma surrounding HIV-AIDS.

“I will not live in fear. I want to stand up for other people who may be more vulnerable or with less of a support network.

“Until there are enough people living with the condition saying ‘this is who I am and I cannot pass on the infection’ the stigma will not go away,” he said.

The National Diversity Awards are taking place at Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral (6.15pm) on Friday, September 20 with hosts Sally Phillips and Alex Brooker.

Source – www.surreycomet.co.uk

The world’s first ever Disability in Policing Conference was held today (Wednesday 5th June) hosted by the Disabled Police Association (DPA) in Hertfordshire.

Formed in July 2012, the Association welcomed members of the police family from across the country who live with or care for loved ones with disabilities.

The event, with the theme ‘Enable not Disable’, was held at The Fielder Centre in Hatfield and sponsored by Police Mutual and Police Care UK.

It was also supported by the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC), Hertfordshire Chief Constable Charlie Hall and Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd.

DPA president Dr Rob Gurney, said: “The aim of the event was to bring together those who work within policing and live with disabilities to provide support and advice as well as share good practice in relation to supporting our officers and staff in the workplace”

The DPA is a national body that represents disability support networks within police forces across the UK. Its main aim is to promote equality of opportunity for disabled people who work for police forces.

The event’s guest speakers were Permanent Secretary at the Home Office Sir Philip Rutnam, who spoke about his role as the Civil Service Disability Champion, and CEO of The Police Dependents’ Trust Gill Scott-Moore, who spoke to guests about the work of the charity in supporting ill or injured people.

There were also contributions from NPCC lead for Disability Janette McCormick QPM, Hertfordshire Assistant Chief Constable Nathan Briant, Vice-President of the DPA Simon Nelson from Sussex and Vice-President of the Police Superintendents Association Ian Wylie.

Rob said: “Today’s event provided some really positive learning outcomes and showed the valuable contribution that those with disabilities make to policing up and down the country.

A surprise addition to the event was the presentation of several awards to police forces and individuals who have influenced and influenced the disability agenda within Policing which again was a first ever.. These included the following:

 

Most improved Disability Network

Winners – Merseyside Disability Support Network

 Positive Cultural Change

 Winners – West Midlands Police

Outstanding Force Contribution to Disability

Winners – Sussex Police

President’s Award Outstanding Individual Contribution to Disability in Policing

Winner – Anna Button – West Yorkshire Police

 

Source – Disabled Police Association

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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