Gill Springgay has been nominated in the Positive Role Model category at the National Diversity Awards 2019 for her work in styling and providing makeup for transgender women.

Helping transgender women with their transition was not something Gill Springgay had initially intended to do when she launched her image consultancy service.

But when a male friend unexpectedly asked her to do his makeup, she realised there was no image consultancy service for a person who was transgender. She changed her client focus and launched Makeover Girl Reinvent Yourself, working with males who are transitioning or have already transitioned.

Now, following 10 years of helping male clients make the first steps towards transitioning into a female, she has been nominated in the Positive Role Model category at the National Diversity Awards 2019.

Gill, who works from her studio at her Eccleston home, says: “I used to be a housing officer for Chorley Council and I got made redundant. I always had a vision to set up a makeover and image consultancy business as I have always been interested in hair and makeup ever since I was a little girl.

“I studied at night school and set up a website.“A male friend came to me and asked if I could do his makeup and make him look female. He came to my home and we had a talk about how he would looking terms of clothes, hair and makeup and. I was completely amazed at how feminine I could make him look. He was happy and I thought I had a talent for it. I saw the possibility of what I could do.”

Gill began seeking out transgender support groups and visited the Manchester Concord social group, offering demonstrations every month. She adds: “I have never had any female clients. I decided to focus on transgender women. There are a lot of people who need my help and I have lots of clients in transition.”

Gill’s work reaches beyond teaching about hair and makeup, as she helps her clients become more confident in their new look and accept who they are. She adds: “I go out shopping with my clients and quite often it is their first step out. “I give them the ability to see themselves as females, rather than a man in drag. They never thought they could look feminine until I teach them how. “I give my clients makeup tutorials and look at their body shape so I can tell them what clothes suit them. I do a colour analysis and as I stock wigs to suit their face shape and skin tone.”

Gill develops strong friendships with her clients and supports them through their transitional journey.She adds: “I am not a trained counsellor but I can support my clients as I listen to them and help them feel relaxed. In some cases, I am the first person they have told about transitioning.
“I have a few links with gender clinics and counsellors where I can signpost people to.

“Not everyone is in transition. Quite a lot of clients seem to be the same age – in their 40s, 50s and 60s – who are married and have had children. “They have struggled to keep their identity in and are scared to make the first step. “It is hard enough dealing with their image as they thought they were male and they are now presenting themselves as female. Even though the concept is more accepted in society, it is still terrifying for the person. But when they are fully dressed they feel more relaxed as their brain is telling them they are a woman.”

Gill has more than 100 clients from all over the UK and has people coming from as far as London, Ireland and Scotland. She has also written various magazine articles on the subject and was poised to take part in a Channel Four documentary until her client no longer wished to take part.

Gill, who has two daughters aged 14 and 12, says: “I was the first image consultant exclusively for transgender women and I offer a specialist service so I have clients from quite far. I have links to a local B&B so people can stay overnight. I had Channel Four filming in my home as part of The Making Of Me. I was supposed to be on episode four but my client pulled out so we didn’t get aired.

“I have been lucky enough to have been invited several times to judge Miss Transliving in Eastbourne and Miss Rose Pageant in Scarborough, donating prizes and offering my sponsorship. I also attended the Beaumont Society Harrogate events for several years offering my services and sponsorship. I also voluntarily wrote regular fashion and beauty articles for their magazine. My service has grown and grown, so much so I have been mentored by Virgin, who is helping me upgrade my website and promote my business. I have been asked to represent them via their Virgin.com website, as they are big advocates of diversity.”

Part of Gill’s aim is to educate people about transgender and make the notion more accepted.
She adds: “My aim is to break down barriers and show it is normal. People who are transgender are no different to anybody else.”

Gill now needs your votes to be shortlisted for the next stage of the National Diversity Awards 2019, which take place at Liverpool Anglican Cathedral on September 20.
To vote, visit www.nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate. Voting closes May 31 and the shortlisted nominees will be announced soon after that.

Source – Written by Natalie Walker as featured in The Lancashire Post  – https://www.lep.co.uk/news/people/how-eccleston-mum-has-been-helping-to-style-and-inspire-transgender-women-through-her-makeover-girl-reinvent-yourself-image-consultancy-1-9786731

YORK charity Accessible Arts & Media is in the running for a National Diversity Award 2019.

Based at Sanderson House, Bramham Road, Chapelfields, the charity has been nominated in the Community Organisation category.

Kelly Langford, project manager and marketing coordinator, said: “These awards celebrate the excellent achievements of grassroots communities that tackle the issues in today’s society, giving them recognition for their dedication and hard work,so it’s a real honour for us to have been nominated.”

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral will play host to the awards ceremony on September 20, when “Britain’s most inspirational and selfless people will come together to honour the rich tapestry of our nation”, recognising nominees in their respective fields of diversity, whether age, disability, gender, race, faith, religion and sexual orientation.

Accessible Arts & Media (AAM)has been running inclusive arts and media learning programmes in and around York since 1982. At present the focus is on projects for learning disabled young people and adults, older people living with dementia and memory loss and people with mental ill health, with the aim of helping people to develop the skills and confidence to become involved in their community and have more of a say in what matters to them.

Creative director Rose Kent said: “We’re incredibly proud that our work’s been recognised with a nomination for a National Diversity Award. The awards are all about celebrating inclusion and diversity, which is what we do every day at AAM. We believe that everyone can learn, everyone can be creative, and everyone can contribute to their local community; they just need the right support. It would mean the world to us to win the award and put York on the map as an inclusive city.”

The National Diversity Awards receive more than 25,000 nominations and votes annually. Nominations for who should win are now open and will close on May 31; shortlisted nominees will be announced in June. The judging panel will take the number of nominations received for each nominee into account when making its decision. “Don’t miss out on your chance to get involved and support Accessible Arts & Media,” urged Rose.

To nominate Accessible Arts & Media and explain why you think they should win an award, visit nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate/23007 or email emma@nationaldiversityawards.co.uk for a nomination form.

Source – Written by Charles Hutchinson as featured in The York Press – https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/17653916.york-charity-accessible-arts-nominated-for-national-diversity-award/

Autism, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia to name but a few. They’re all conditions we’ve heard of, but there’s now a word to describe them all.

‘Neurodiversity’ refers to the different ways the brain can work and interpret information.

According to the Department of Education, 15% of students in the UK have a what’s called ‘learning difference’, and now a 16-year old girl wants to honour them all – with the creation of ‘Neurodiversity Celebration Week’.

Many neurodivergent adults look back on their school days in a negative light. They spent much of their time at school feeling embarrassed and humiliated. Speaking to ITV News, Siena Castellon says often students with neurodiversities are made to feel like failures.

She says their ability to fulfil their potential is threatened by the stigma associated with having an educational need, and the misconceptions many people still have about those with a learning difference.

Siena is on a mission to break down those barriers.

She’s set up a website dedicated to the inaugural week, and so far almost 300 schools across the UK have pledged their support.

They will either organise lessons to educate the wider student population about Neurodiversity, or will hang up posters around their schools to raise awareness.

The idea for the week came up after Siena found comfort in Anti-Bullying Week. She’d been bullied at school for having a number of learning differences.

Just like the national Anti-Bullying Week, she wanted Neurodiversity to have the same platform.

Being neurodivergent includes having ADHD, Autism and Dyslexia and more.

All forms of neurodivergence bring strengths as well as difficulties. The creation of this week hopes to celebrate those strengths.

“In order to help us to flourish, I believe schools should stop focusing only on what we cannot do and should begin to acknowledge and celebrate the many positive aspects of being neurodiverse.“It is important for schools to recognise our many strengths: our creativity, innovation, ability to think outside-the-box, problem-solving skills, unique insights and perspectives, perseverance and resilience.”– SIENA CASTELLON, FOUNDER

 

Arundel resident Charlotte Twinley, 21, has been nominated for a Positive Role Model for disabilities at the National Diversity Awards. Charlotte was diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) when she was 15 years old. EDS is a connective tissue disorder, affecting all of the collagen in the body which supports joints, muscles and organs. This caused her to have severe digestive complications. This greatly affected her life, causing her to stop being able to take part in sports. This all led her to develop anxiety, depression and anorexia.

Soon after, Charlotte had to leave university, and have a completely liquid diet for a year, until she had surgery to get a stoma bag. Now Charlotte uses social media and the internet to help others who are going through similar problems, spread awareness and end the stigma towards stomas, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and mental health problems.

Charlotte said: “Now, less than a year into having my stoma, I’m able to go out and eat and, what’s even more important, I want to eat and finally fully appreciate food again. I finally feel comfortable in my own skin. I’m raising awareness for EDS and chronic illness and helping those who are in a similar situation as I was as much as I can on Instagram.

I worked with Barcroft TV to produce a video on YouTube and Snapchat about EDS and my ileostomy – highlighting the fact that it’s not just people with cancer, crohns and colitis that have a stoma. The YouTube video has over 203,000 views and I received 60+ messages on social media about my video after it was released on Snapchat, all of which I replied to. I’m taking part and modelling for campaigns about body image and health conditions, like a campaign organised by Love Disfigure and NuNude outside of Victoria’s Secret for more inclusivity – this became viral with Huffpost, LadBible, Daily Mail and People writing articles about it, as well as many others around the world.

In January 2019, I was part of an article in Glamour Paris talking about how I raise awareness for stomas on Instagram. I have also set up my own website, sharing my story and have started to blog about various topics; such as diversity, disabilities and mental health. I’m dedicated to raise awareness for mental health, for eating disorders, for body dysmorphia, for body confidence, for diversity and for encouraging people to love and accept their bodies the way they are. I want to be the girl I needed to see when I was struggling. I want to be the best role model I can be.”

If you would like to vote for Charlotte for you can do so herehttps://nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate/22295/

You can also follow her on her blog and Instagram.

Source – www . Sussex Local . Net

 

THREE influential role models have been nominated for a prestigious national award.

A police sergeant, an MP’s inspirational caseworker and a Whitefield mum who was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was 12 have all been nominated in the UK’ largest Diversity Awards.

Sgt Abed Hussain, who has served with Greater Manchester Police for 24 years, and Ummrana Farooq, a caseworker for MP James Frith, have been nominated for being positive role models for race, religion and faith.

Mum-of-six Emma Murphy, from Whitefield, has been nominated as a positive role model in the disability category. Based on her own experiences, Emma has been campaigning to raise awareness of the dangers of taking Epilim — one of the registered trade names of the anti-epilepsy drug sodium valporate.

Mrs Farooq, aged 43, said: “I am keen to leave a lasting legacy in the Bury community and I aspire to be a great role model to my own children and to wider society.”

The mum-of-five said “her life changed completely” after she began working as a caseworker for James Frith, MP for Bury North, handling asylum and immigration enquiries for constituents.

She had previously worked at Bury Carer’s Centre, organising various multicultural events, with a focus on promoting equality and diversity.

As her influence expanded, Mrs Farooq has also been appointed fundraiser for Muslim Hands charity, parent governor at The Derby High School and St Thomas’s Primary School, as well as the chief BAME co-ordinator for the Bury North Labour Party.

Mrs Farooq added: “I have been asked how I manage being a British Pakistani Muslim wife, mother, friend, work colleague and community volunteer. To give inspiration to other women, especially the ethnic minority, I recently started a blog of my inspirational journey, hoping to reach out to the women worldwide.”

Meanwhile, Sgt Hussain is recognised for his work to build relationships between members of the police force, faith leaders and young people.

He created Bury’s LGBT Rainbow Walks and first ever Pride march. He also set up the Bury Muslim Forum, which has helped to increase the understanding and reporting of domestic abuse and other issues, and planning the multi-faith Collabor8e event.

In December 2018, he received a Queen’s Police Medal (QPM) in recognition of his contributions to policing.

This year’s Diversity Awards, which recognise role models of diversity within various fields, will take place at Liverpool Cathedral on September 20.

Source – Written by a Bury Times Reporter as featured in The Bury Times – https://www.burytimes.co.uk/news/17643626.influential-role-models-from-bury-nominated-for-diversity-award/

 

A man from Surbiton who defied the odds to recover from a late diagnosis of HIV and go on to fight for disability rights has been nominated for a national award.

Roland Chesters, who was given just two weeks to live at the time of his diagnosis, has suffered long term effects on his brain and motor skills because the virus was picked up and treated at a late stage.

He has overcome post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic ill health and discrimination to bring greater disability rights to the workplace and tackle the stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS.

Now Roland’s work has been recognised by The National Diversity Awards (NDA), whose supporters include Graham Norton, Katie Piperand Adam Hills.

Roland, who works as a disability development consultant at Luminate, said: “I am delighted to be nominated for such a prestigious award and hope it will raise awareness of the hidden disability that is HIV and AIDs.

“There is still a fear and ignorance about HIV, which puts people off getting tested. I want to spread the message that those on medication are undetectable and cannot pass it on.”

The NDA are the UK’s largest diversity awards, which recognises inspirational people in fields of diversity including age, disability, gender, race, faith, religion and sexual orientation.

Sir Lenny Henry CBE, a previously shortlisted nominee for the Celebrity of the Year gong said: “Diversity to me means involving everybody without any discrimination; its means having integrated groups in society, it means fairness and total inclusion and that’s what the National Diversity Awards are about. Congratulations to everyone who has been nominated, you’re all doing a fantastic job, rock on!”

Roland, 59, became a chair for the disabled staff network at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, where he previously worked as a language-testing specialist. He introduced a change of policy – enabling disabled staff to no longer have to regularly change jobs.

The Royal Holloway University of London graduate helps employers in various industries to create an inclusive workforce and for their employees to develop confidence in their role.

Roland supports a number of charities and community projects, such as the Terrence Higgins’ Trust Positive Voices, where he speaks about HIV at schools, colleges and workplaces in order to tackle existing stereotypes.

He has volunteered as a mentor withPositively UK, a charity which offers peer-led support. During this time, he has supported people who have been ostracised and attacked after they ‘came out’ with their diagnosis

One man, who was sexually assaulted and cannot be named for legal reasons, was afraid to leave his home until he worked with Roland.

The man has nominated Roland for the award, saying: “Roland took me under his wing and helped me to conquer my fears as I use to lock myself indoors. Roland helps me say ‘I have HIV.”

Roland, who was diagnosed in 2006, has also sat on a number of boards, including the National Long Term Survivors Group (NLTSG), which supports HIV Positive people, and the London AIDS Memorial Campaign and Disability Rights UK – where at the time he was the only gay, disabled person on the board.

Roland has widely shared his own story in order to break-down barriers. In 2018 he published Ripples from the Edge of Life, which is both a memoir and self-help book.

Roland, who continues to speak out at events and in the press, said: “I will not live in fear. I want to stand up for other people who may be more vulnerable or with less of a support network”.

“Until there are enough people living with the condition saying ‘this is who I am and I cannot pass on the infection the stigma will not go away.”

Roland lives with his partner, Richard, in Surbiton, Surrey. He enjoys opera, classical music, theatre and fashion.

The NDA receives over 25,000 nominations and votes each year. Founder and CEO Paul Sesay said: “We look to those who represent progress, spirit and resilience and I cannot wait to learn about the wonderful work being carried out this year.”

You can vote for Roland until May 31.

To vote online, click here:

Source : www . Gscene . com

Dennis Relojo-Howell a mental health advocate and founder of Psychreg from Rainham, Essex has been nominated for the Entrepreneur of Excellence Award at The National Diversity Awards 2019.

The Breathtaking Liverpool Anglican Cathedral will play host to this year’s awards, to be held on 20th September. Britain’s most inspirational and selfless people will come together to honour the rich tapestry of our nation, recognising individuals and groups from grass roots communities.

The prestigious black tie event recognises nominees in their respective fields of diversity including age, disability, gender, race, faith, religion and sexual orientation.

Growing up in a slum in Manila in the Philippines, Dennis has witnessed first-hand how discussions about mental health are considered a luxury – which is understandable given that there are numerous other issues which are deemed to be more pressing.

Dennis’s childhood experience led him to launch Psychreg, a global mental health platform, in order to address the stigma around mental health. His passion in promoting the therapeutic value of blogging has led him to be recognised as the world’s first blog psychologist.

As a psychology website, Psychreg runs a blog, a podcast, and an open access journal, Psychreg Journal of Psychology.

Leading global brand Johnson & Johnson were 2018 headline sponsors of the UK’s largest diversity awards, attracting a growing list of supporters including Adam Hills, Graham Norton and Katie Piper.

Sir Lenny Henry CBE, who was previously shortlisted for the Celebrity of the Year award said: ‘Diversity to me means involving everybody without any discrimination. It means having integrated groups in society. It means fairness and total inclusion and that’s what the National Diversity Awards are about. Congratulations to everyone who has been nominated. You’re all doing a fantastic job, rock on!’

Actor Warwick Davis and human rights activist Abbey Kiwanuka received accolades at last year’s ceremony, alongside a host of incredible award winners.

Kick It Out, the UK’s Leading organisation campaigning for equality in football, beat seven other competitors for the Race, Faith & Religion category, and Rocking2Stomas blogger Rachel Jury was praised for using her impressive following to shine a light on urostomy awareness.

ADHD Foundation were commended for changing attitudes and improving life chances through tireless campaigning, and Action Breaks Silence were applauded for offering free self-defence training to over 50,000 women and girls at risk of gender-based violence.

Sail NI were praised for supporting over 300 transgender people and their families across the Northern Ireland, and Geoff Holt MBE scooped the Entrepreneur of Excellence Award for founding Wetwheels, taking more than 5,000 disabled people on the water each year.

Radio Reverb, Touchstone and Rachael Pearson were also recognised among some of the UK’s most inspiring role models and community organisations.

The National Diversity Awards receives over 25,000 nominations and votes annually. Founder and CEO Paul Sesay said: ‘As we enter our 8th awards season, The National Diversity Awards prepare to welcome a host of outstanding role models and charities to our family. We look to those who represent progress, spirit and resilience; and I cannot wait to learn about the wonderful work being carried out this year.’

Source – www . Essex – TV . co . uk

Young champion fundraiser Louis Johnson has been named as one of Birmingham Children’s Hospital Charity’s Hundred Heroes.

Twelve-year-old Louis has so far raised more than £6,000 for Birmingham Children’s Hospital in support of children being cared for at the hospital.

Louis, who lives in Tettenhall Wood, said he was really excited to learn he had been named as one of the charity’s Hundred Heroes – which recognises individuals who support the charity.

Louis, who is a pupil at Smestow School, said: “I was really excited and happy to learn that I have been told I am one of Birmingham Children’s Hospital Charity’s Hundred Heroes. I was completely over the moon.

“I have raised more than £6,000 for the charity now and so far have raised £600 for them through my upcoming walk.”

Serena Daw, public fundraising manager at Birmingham Children’s Hospital Charity, added: “We are thrilled to announce Louis as one of our Hundred Heroes. These awards are an opportunity for us to celebrate and thank our supporters for their extraordinary efforts over the past year, and Louis is fully deserving of this recognition.

“To date, Louis has raised over £6,000 for us and has been so passionate about supporting our sick kids. From tea parties to charity walks, he is always looking at new ways to fundraise. He truly is a hero – well done Louis.”

On Saturday Louis will be walking 15 miles in a fancy dress costume to Birmingham Children’s Hospital, from Tettenhall, in a bid to raise more funds for the charity. When he reaches the hospital, he will give teddy bears and colouring books to the young patients.

He will then return to Wolverhampton by train before collecting money in the city centre’s Queen Square.

In eight years of fundraising, since he was five years old, Louis has raised nearly £20,000 for a variety of local charities.

Louis has also been nominated for a Positive Role Model Award at the 2019 National Diversity Awards!

 

Source – www . Express and Star . com

Two West Yorkshire Police employees have been nominated in the national Control Room Awards 2019.

The awards are due to take place this Thursday (7 March) at the De Vere Orchard Hotel in Nottingham.

Chief Inspector Nick Rook has been nominated for the award for Services to the Public and police staff member Eddie McEvoy is nominated in the Special Recognition for Bravery and Courage category.

Chief Inspector Rook is one of only a handful of registered sight impaired officers in the UK and has previously been nominated in the National Diversity Awards and European Diversity Awards for his work as a role model for other disabled police employees.

He has been a serving police officer for 20 years but four years ago suffered health complications which resulted in him losing nearly all his sight in his right eye. Since then he has suffered complications with his left eye, also affecting his vision. He was determined to retain his current position in the Force Communications Department and is now using specialist equipment to ensure he can still work effectively.

Chief Inspector Rook returned to work as soon as he could after losing sight in his right eye and since then has assisted with rebranding and setting up the first operations centre for the National Police Air Service, designed a new shift pattern which reduced sickness levels and brought in a replacement command and control system which saved the Force thousands of pounds.

He is also an executive member of the West Yorkshire Police Disability Association, a role in which he engages with others and tries to break down disability barriers.

Chief Inspector Rook said: “It is humbling to receive such recognitions. What I am really pleased about, especially taking into account Eddie’s nomination, is that these awards shine the spotlight on the hard work my colleagues in Contact Management do every day behind the scenes.”

Police staff member Eddie McEvoy, who works as an Initial Contact Officer in the Force Communications Department, has been nominated for talking a potentially suicidal male off a bridge. He was off-duty at the time of the incident in January 2018.

Being an experienced call handler, Eddie was aware of the potential risks to himself of approaching an individual with mental health issues who was in crisis. However, he took the decision to stop at the scene, talked the male away from the barrier and walked with him off the bridge.

This is the second year in a row that Eddie has been nominated for a Control Room Award.

Senior Contact manager Tom Donohoe said: “The APD Control Room awards are an important way to recognise those staff who work tirelessly and with dedication and commitment, but are not always in the public eye.

“I am delighted that for the second year running West Yorkshire Police have been nominated. It’s great to be in company with unsung heroes from other police forces, the fire service and smbulance service.

“These awards are a great way to recognise all the work that these staff do, day in and day out.”

Source – West Yorkshire Police

Sajid Rashid BEM has won the ‘One to Watch’ award at the seventh annual British Muslim Awards.

A Burton-on-Trent philanthropist has won the ‘One to Watch’ award at the seventh annual British Muslim Awards.

Sajid Rashid BEM is regarded as one of Britain’s most inspirational figures scooping many of the UK’s top national accolades including The National Diversity Awards & JCI UK’s Ten Outstanding Young Person (TOYP) awards.

“It’s an honour and privilege to accept this award. Firstly I would like to thank the Lord almighty for

everything he has blessed me with and congratulations to all the finalists and winners, win or lose, in my eyes you are all winners. It people such as yourselves that put the ‘Great’ back into Great Britain,” said Sajid.

The awards were held at the Bradford Hotel with more than 300 of the most remarkable British Muslims shortlisted as finalists.

The awards were held to recognise a wide range of achievements from outstanding Muslim individuals across the UK who positively impact business, charity, sport, arts, culture, religious advocacy, education and medicine among others, and simultaneously and unknowingly battle negative stereotypes every day.

The awards endeavour to showcase the strength of the British Muslim community, the impact it has on culture and its achievements over the last year as well as highlighting the significant role Muslims play in contributing to a better Britain.

Irfan Younis, CEO of Oceanic Consulting said: “I’d like to congratulate all the winners and every finalist from the seventh British Muslim Awards 2019. Every year I think we’ve seen the best the British Muslim community has to offer but every year I’m blown away by just how special the talent is and just how hard people work to service their communities. I already look forward to seeing what next year has to offer; I have no doubt that the Muslim community will continue to thrive and act as leaders for future generations to come.”

Source – www . Derby Telegraph . co . uk

 

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