New research had identified that it is essential for employers to improve support for working fathers in order to achieve equality for working mothers. Organisations need to go further than setting policy to achieve this – they need working practices that make it easier for employees to share parental responsibilities between mum and dad. Contributor Rebecca Hourston, Head of Working Parent & Executive Coaching Programmes – Talking Talent.

It is a key conclusion from research commissioned by Talking Talent, a global coaching consultancy leading the gender diversity agenda, who asked Censuswide to talk to over 7,000 working parents about their experiences. Successfully sharing their role as parents is essential for women to continue the progression of their careers and is key to closing the gender pay gap.  But it will only succeed if organisations ensure working dads don’t face exactly the same negative experiences which have stopped working mums progressing in the past.

The research found that over half (52 percent) of working parents, including 26 percent men and 30 percent women, think that their career has slowed down compared to their childless colleagues.

With 44 percent of working mothers found it difficult to keep an interesting job – but even more working fathers (53 percent) are finding this a challenge too. ‘Working parent guilt’ isn’t the preserve of mothers either, and more men (66 percent) than women (60 percent) felt guilty at not spending enough time with their children. And it appears that working dads are finding it harder to secure support from their employers too. 57 percent of all those surveyed wanted flexible working hours. While 21 percent of women have never had a request turned down, only 14 percent of men experienced the same.

Rebecca Hourston, Head of Working Parent & Executive Coaching Programmes at Talking Talent, said: “Stepping up to address these challenges is an important future investment for organisations. Attitudes and expectations are changing fast among young people and 68 percent of our respondents expected that the next generation would find it just as hard as them to balance work and parenthood.”

Sharing towards a solution
The research shows how shared parental leave (SPL) can lead the way. In the UK, two-thirds (66 percent) of working parents agreed that SPL can benefit couples by preparing them to share parental responsibilities more equally in future years.

Rebecca Hourston from Talking Talent continued: “How your organisation talks about parental leave – how openly it communicates – tells us everything we need to know about their commitment to gender equality. To send a clear and positive message, employers need to be transparent and proactive in publishing their policies on parental leave.”

The research shows that over half of parents (56 percent) would have been very likely to share parental leave if their pay and working conditions had met their needs. BUT, half of respondents (51 percent) thought that fathers who took SPL would experience a detrimental effect on their careers, and 53 percent feared judgement if they chose SPL.

Rebecca Hourston from Talking Talent added: “Employers have a crucial role to play in making SPL both available and appealing. Organisations with their fingers on the pulse need to encourage both men and women to view SPL in a more positive light by demonstrating that with the right support, the relationship between parenthood and professional success can be mutually beneficial.”

Practice what you promise…
Where do organisations start? The new research points them in the right direction. More than half of working parents (53 percent) experienced a significant gap between what their workplace says it’s doing and what it’s actually doing; around half of that group (26 percent of the total) made this point strongly.

One in three parents surveyed, struggled to understand their company’s policy on parental leave for example. Rebecca Hourston from Talking Talent said: “By debunking tired myths about theoretical losses of skills or the supposed dangers of flexible working, this report challenges all types of organisations to close the gap between their policies for supporting working parents and their actual, ongoing practices. Achieving this will be a vital step towards truly inclusive behaviour.”

 

Source – The HR Director

Parents have spoken of their wishes to build a centre for children with autism.

Aaron and Rachael Pearson are looking to raise £50,000 for the Autism Inclusion Centre. The couple, from Denmead, have a son with the condition and want to expand on Rachael’s charity Autism Isolation No More which she runs from their front room.The centre will create a place where children with autism and their families can go to have fun and relax.

Aaron and Rachael’s plans come just days after the pair were both successful in winning national awards. Rachael won the Positive Role Model for Gender Award at the National Diversity Awards after she turned their living room into a sensory space for youngsters with autism.Meanwhile, Aaron won £10,000 worth of building materials after winning Jewson’s Building Better Communities Trade Hero 2018 award.

Rachael said: ‘We want to try and buy a piece of land so we can build a log cabin and move all our services from our living room there. ‘There will be a place for all the sensory equipment and children and families can go in and relax, parents can chat and join in a play session and stay for longer.’At the moment I can only work with families on an individual basis but I want to hold group events.

That’s beneficial for the children because social interaction is more enjoyable for them.’A number of Rachael’s family members are autistic including her two sons, her brother and nephew.She added: ‘I saw the lack of support my mother had with children with autism, it affected my life. If she had support there are so many things that could have been different.

‘As a parent of a child with autism you can feel lonely, the sleep deprivation is awful.’I provide support for parents and want them to know they’re not alone, I’ll never judge.’

Rachael and Aaron will use the prize from Jewson to help start the log cabin but need funds to get it off the ground. Aaron said: ‘We’ve got the building materials now we’re basically trying to get the project off the ground.‘It’s a mission we both have and it would fulfil us.’

Anyone wishing to donate should visit autismisolationnomore.com.

Source – Written by Ellie Pilmoor & Tamara Siddiqui as featured in The News – https://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/health/denmead-parents-call-for-donations-to-help-build-autism-children-s-centre-1-8647460

Marks & Spencer has achieved what is said to be a high street first by introducing a new line of clothing catered to disabled children.

The supermarket and fashion retailer has designed easy dressing, a range of clothing designed to be easier to those with disabilities to put on and take off.

Children using wheelchairs, crutches, or who have different needs can now have all the same clothes as their able counterparts, but specifically designed for their bodies.

M&S got one mum, Emma, to try out some of the outfits on her five-year-old twins Edward and Celia.

‘There are around 1.5 million children in the UK who have a sensory or physical disability,’ explained M&S online.

‘So after talking to parents and experts, we’ve developed an easy-dressing range for kids that’s fun to wear, plus the designs are the same as our standard range, so kids have the choice to wear the same cool clothes as their friends or siblings.

‘From all-in-ones that allow for a cast (for hip dysplasia) to tees and dresses with discreet pockets for feeding tubes, the range uses the softest materials, the fewest seams possible and hidden care labels that won’t irritate sensitive skin.’

To show off the range, the company used youngsters with Down’s Syndrome, cerebral palsy, and hip dysplasia, to show off bodysuits, detachable jackets, coats, and trousers with spaces for nappies and leg openings to ensure a quick change.

Emma, who got a sneak peak of the line for her children, explained how it worked for her twins, Edward and Celia.

‘Edward has hemiplegia, which is cerebral palsy that affects his right side. He has limited control and movement in his arm and leg and epilepsy. We use a wheelchair a lot of the time, particularly when Edward’s tired,’ she said

‘That’s why this range is great. The velcro fastening down the back of the sweater and bodywarmer means I can easily get Edward ready to go out when he’s in his wheelchair.

‘I haven’t seen anything else like this before – Edward loved how cool they looked. The dress Celia wore is in the standard and adapted range too, meaning it can also be removed easily with the velcro strip. I’m sure loads of girls out there will love to wear it – Celia did!’

It’s all affordable too, ranging from £2.50 to £26. You can purchase the line here.

 

Source: Metro Newspaper

 

Mental Health and Wellbeing Charity Touchstone ranked number 1 for a second year in a row on The Inclusive Top 50 UK Employers List earlier this year, showcasing exceptional levels of representation across all protected characteristics at Senior Management, Executive and Board level. The Leeds based charity was born in 1982 after it was acknowledged that large numbers of vulnerable people were left feeling isolated and distressed. More than 30 years on and Touchstone provide services to over 6,000 people per year, aiming to make the cities they work in more culturally competent. Their strong submission showcases phenomenal commitment to diversity across various topics including recruitment, training, community initiatives, employee engagement and mentoring schemes. Evidence provided is a testament to Touchstone’s passion and determination to putting equality, diversity and inclusion at the heart of the charity.

We spoke with Alison Lowe, CEO at Touchstone after they won The Diverse Company Award at The National Diversity Awards 2018. Here’s what she had to say:

What were your thoughts on the other shortlisted nominees within your category?

We were really blown away to be included alongside the quality shortlisted nominees and actually thought we would not win.

What were your thoughts after winning The Diverse Company of the Year Award?

Amazed, delighted and determined to keep up the hard work of making Touchstone, and everywhere we operate, the best and most inclusive place we can.  We recognise we can’t change the world – but we can change our little bit of it – and we will whilst ever we have the passion and resources to do so.

What reaction have you received from supporters/fellow employees since winning the award?

Our staff are really proud of our achievement and they tell us it spurs them on to be part of the inclusion solution everyday.  We have been inundated with good will and messages of support from a wide range of partners and stakeholders who are delighted for us, but also for the credit this brings on the communities we work in and with.

Now that you have won a National Diversity Award, where are you going to go from here? What are your next steps?

We are asking our Diversity Action Group to review the application we submitted to identify where we can improve in time for our next submission in 2019.  We have already identified areas of good practice from other organisations around disability practice, for example, which we are going to introduce at Touchstone to increase our inclusion practice even more.

In your own words, how do you feel the work you are carrying out is making a difference?

We feel that Touchstone is a safe place to work and receive services.  We are passionate about bringing our vision of an inclusive world for all to the widest audience possible – and by showcasing our successes on platforms such as NDA – we are spreading the love and the message that hope wins through.

Why do you think it is important to highlight Diversity, Equality and Inclusion?

Because we all matter.  We all have hearts that can be broken and hope that can be extinguished by a cruel or unthinking word. Inclusion means we give hope the heat it needs to catch fire and burn bright – long after that person is no longer here – to inspire others to do great things in the world and give life to our vision of an inclusive world.

Who or What is your inspiration?

People who can forgive and move on to be their best whilst expecting the best from others.  I suppose Nelson Mandela personifies this most aptly but anyone really who has experienced hate or injustice because of who they are but who combats this with passion and love.

What were your thoughts on The National Diversity Awards Ceremony? Did you enjoy your evening?

The National Diversity Awards were amazing.  The setting was majestic and stunning and we felt like VIPs all night long – the goody bags certainly were popular too. There was world class entertainment that met a diverse range of needs and tastes and the food was scrumptious!  We will certainly be there in 2019.

 

The ADHD Foundation is the largest ‘user led’ ADHD agency in Europe and is credited with influencing policy and provision in the UK for those living with ADHD and co existing conditions. The Foundation’s work in promoting scientific evidence, UK and European impact reports and tireless campaigning, have helped to change attitudes and reduce stigma, improving life chances for those with ADHD. One brilliant example of their campaigning was the Umbrella Project, involving children with ADHD and autism, celebrating their gifts, talents and employability and the installation of a public art project of hundreds of brightly coloured umbrellas above the streets of Liverpool and Salford. This went viral globally, attracting over 30 million media hits. The largest provider of training for professionals and schools in the UK, the Foundation enjoys dynamic partnerships with other charities, agencies and businesses nationally.

We spoke with Dr Tony Lloyd CEO at ADHD Foundation after they won The Community Organisation Award for Disability at The National Diversity Awards 2018. Here’s what they had to say:

What were your thoughts on the other shortlisted nominees within your category?

All the nominees were deserving of recognition for their work and dedication.

What were your thoughts after winning The Community Organisation Award for Disability?

As an organisation that has worked tirelessly in the past ten years to influence the ‘national conversation’ around ADHD, we were absolutely delighted – not just for us but especially for the ADHD community in the UK.

ADHD affects 1 in 20 people. Many live happily and successfully with ADHD – but many don’t.  We know for example that 40% experience anxiety and depression, that 18% self harm, that over 30% have co-occurring high functioning autism,  over 70% have another co-occurring learning difficulty.   All these challenges are often not seen or understood by the public, by schools, even by family doctors such is the level of stigma and discrimination about the condition.

It is therefore often impossible  for people to learn how to live successfully with a ‘neurodiversity’ that others – and those in public services dismiss as ‘A  problem relating to children who don’t know how to behave’.

Our strength based approach, challenges  a deficit model of intelligence aim to ‘enable’ those who are ‘disabled’  by a narrow view of intelligence, giftedness, talent and employability. Enabling those with ADHD to see themselves as ‘different’ but not ‘ less than’ – while at the same time trying to influence policy and provision  so that the vulnerability is supported – especially in childhood , has been a unique challenge for us as a user led charity.

Winning this award is testament to the fact that we have influenced hearts and minds, we have influenced other professionals and that we have influenced the media in particular, to promote the concept of ‘neurodiversity’ and in so doing encouraged and supported those in public life to be more openly honest about living with ADHD and showcasing  living successfully with ADHD.  The ND Awards have helped to raise public awareness of the issue, break down stigma and hopefully enable others to recognise that they,  or someone they know, may have ADHD so they can ‘name it, accept it, manage it, get support for it when they need it, celebrate it, live successfully with it – and not be defined or disabled by it.

What reaction have you received from supporters/fellow employees since winning the award?

Overwhelmingly positive! It’s a bit early to say exactly what impact this has had yet.  We hope this award will make others listen to our message, gain support and benefit from what we do.

We hope also that charitable Trusts, employee giving schemes and Corporate & Social Responsibility Directors will consider our charity as an organisation worthy of their support in the future.

As a charity, ADHD has never attracted popular support and certainly we have never generated very much financial resources through  unrestricted donations – but this has begun to change in the past three years.

Most of all, we are genuinely thankful for the recognition and appreciation of who we are, what we do and why and how do it. Somehow, it validates the effort, sacrifice and commitment of so many staff and volunteers.  There is a long way to go we know, this award is a wonderful milestone on the journey!

Now that you have won a National Diversity Award, where are you going to go from here? What are your next steps?

We are a growing organisation and as a charity we have a strong business model to ensure our sustainability –  we don’t measure success based on how much funding we have, but on the impact we have and the difference we make…

We are nominated for European Awards Charity of the Year – that really would be truly wonderful and help put ADHD in the spotlight of national conversation – so we are delighted to be a finalist and hopefully a winner in that.  We didn’t have a template to follow and we have been incredibly fortunate in so many ways so for us we will hopefully be able to do more to help other ADHD support groups and charities across Europe to develop and support  many other children, families and adults.

Service transformation is a ‘constant’ for us so we are looking anew at how we improve everything we do – we are especially delighted that the Umbrella Project will also now happen in London, Manchester, Dublin and Liverpool next year – and in small ways in many schools across the UK. This will not only ensure there are big bright uplifting and colourful public art displays of umbrellas suspended above the street in other cities (and classrooms) but also that many children will as a directl result have lessons in schools about diversity – especially ‘neurodiversity’ and that they will understand what it means to live with ADHD, Autism, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Dyscalculia and sensory processing difficulties – and celebrate neurodiversity!

In your own words, how do you feel the work you are carrying out is making a difference?

It is impossible  to measure this accurately – we provide a range of mental health and education services – mostly in the north west but we also provide training across the UK to schools and health professionals – we believe that ADHD, mental health and the ‘dignity of difference’ is everyone’s business – not just ours.  So… we aspire, through educating everyone, professionals, parents, children, service providers, commissioners, so that they are aware and understand the needs and potential of those with ADHD.

There are so many ‘creatives’ with ADHD, so many athletes, professional footballers, artists, musicians, marketeers, entrepreneurs – and so many waiting to realise their potential,  – hopefully what we do will help in some small way to achieve their goals in life and realise their potential.

It is more than just providing services and support – it is about making ‘neurodiversity’ valued by everyone – especially those who are neurodiverse.

Why do you think it is important to highlight Diversity, Equality and Inclusion?

We could write a book….. but ultimately it is about human evolution, humanity in its rich diversity of colour, race, ability, faith, sexuality, intelligences, innovation, vulnerability.. and humility.

We all do better when we know better. Highlighting diversity, equality and inclusion is about highlighting humanity in all its glorious colour and genius and celebrating that !

Who or What is your inspiration?

Every human being who carried with them a story of belonging, acceptance, triumph, brokenness, love, simplicity – greatness is not fame.

I personally always remember those who were ‘kind’ – throughout my entire life, kindness is the quality that has always stood out. For me it is the only measure. Kindness is imbued with integrity – it seeks nothing for itself, it is experienced not advertised and it transforms human beings who are fortunate enough to have received it and live in appreciation of it.

What were your thoughts on The National Diversity Awards Ceremony? Did you enjoy your evening?

A wonderful celebration – uplifting; I had a grin on my face the whole evening, my self and my colleagues and supporters where inspired by the individuals and organisations nominated – many who do unseen and unsung work – and this was their night.  Best awards event I have ever experienced.

..and very well organised!

Choosing to inspire,We never want to retire,

Lives to save and protect,On the past we must reflect,

We take steps forward a learn from mistakes,In life there aren’t any retakes,

The people we meet,The ones we greet,

Stand tall on your feet,Listen and watch your life is a movie- take your seat,

Love and be proud of the person you have become,Unlock the door to your dreams – you are welcome ,

Every year,We must wipe the tears and choose to cheer,

Life is tough,The road is rough,

We are at our best,So forget the rest,

We are stronger than we ever believed we were and could be,Set your soul free,

Focus on the positives and the light, Be the star that shines so bright,

People gravitate towards your kind heart, You are your own cheerleader for your team that everyone wants to be a part,

Open your mind,The treasure you can find,

Dark days do bring rain,We suffer through a lot of pain,

From our struggles we have so much to gain, So go out and dance in the rain,

The world is full of people making a change for a better, Be a go-getter,

Life is a gift, So don’t just drift,

Leave footprints in the Earth’s core, You have the world to explore,

I am so lucky and blessed, To be right here I wouldn’t have guessed,

My life went off road for a while, I have chosen to smile,

Inspired by my strength and pain, I’ve realised from my darkness I have so much to gain,

I have so much more to give, To fate we must forgive,

Turn the darkness into light, Keeping dreams and goals in sight,

Empowering and inspiring people all around, Keep your feet on the ground,

If you give your best that is all that can be asked, With many hardships you have been tasked,

The strength you show, More than you know,

Helps to inspire and empower, In kindness always chose to shower,

You are rocking life and adding your own mark, One bright and beautiful spark,

Choosing to inspire, Never wishing or wanting to retire.

THE ADHD Foundation has been shortlisted for the Community Organisation Award for Disability at the National Diversity Awards 2018. The charity has been recognised for its ground-breaking work supporting children, young people and their families living with ADHD. The awards ceremony will take place at Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral on 14 September.

National Diversity Awards (NDA) celebrates the achievements of people and organisations that tackle diversity issues in today’s society, giving them recognition for their dedication and hard work. The awards are for people who inspire other individuals through their work, through their commitment to helping others, through their infectious personalities and through adversity.

The ADHD Foundation is the largest ‘user led’ ADHD agency in Europe and is credited with influencing policy and provision in the UK for those living with ADHD and co-existing conditions. The Foundation also stages the largest annual multidisciplinary conference on ADHD attended by over 800 delegates from the UK and Europe each year.

The nomination recognises the Foundation’s work in promoting scientific evidence, its role in the creation of UK and European impact reports and the tireless campaigning which have helped to change attitudes in the UK, influencing national policy, provision and best practice, reducing stigma and stereotyping and in so doing, improving life chances for those with ADHD.

One example of the Foundation’s campaigning work is the Umbrella Project – promoting ‘neurodiversity’ involving children with ADHD and autism celebrating their ‘super powers’, talents and employability with a public art project which saw hundreds of brightly coloured umbrellas above the streets of Liverpool and Media City, Salford.

Dr Tony Lloyd, chief executive of ADHD Foundation, said: “In just over ten years the ADHD Foundation has the largest user led service of its kind in the UK. This nomination is recognition of the work our whole organisation does to support over 3,000 families across the UK each year, 50,000 families who use their social media and the training we provide to a further 4,000 teachers and healthcare professionals. We hope this nomination will help bring further attention to our objectives of challenging negative perceptions, bringing about positive change and inclusion within policy and Build a positive foundation for life for people living with ADHD.”

Paul Sesay, Founder and CEO of the National Diversity Awards added: “So many heartfelt testimonies really showcased how these people and organisations are having a profound impact on the lives of others, and I applaud them for their dedication to each specific cause. Congratulations to all of our shortlisted nominees, it is a privilege to recognise your bravery, resilience and courage and I am honoured to share this with the nation. I look forward to congratulating you in person in September”.

To view a full list of nominees visit www.nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/shortlist

Source: Good News Liverpool

The initiative involves independent mentoring and coaching, special events with inspirational women speakers, regular communications highlighting the visibility of women in leadership roles, and campaigning across the UK for firms to get more women in the boardroom.

“The response has been nothing short of overwhelming and demonstrates the desire to achieve gender equality in British boardrooms,” said the 31-year-old associate solicitor at McAlister Family Law.

“With movements such as Times Up gaining serious traction, now is the right time for Leading Ways to really blaze a trail of gender equality in the boardrooms of Great Britain,” she added.

“And I believe that the talented and powerful women in the North will lead the way.”

Percy sits on the board of Manchester Law Society and is chair of the Solicitors Group in Manchester.

“I plan to focus my efforts this year on engaging more Manchester firms, so that we as a region can become a beacon for the legal industry across the country, addressing gender inequality in the kind of practical and effective way that delivers genuine results”, she said.

“My long term vision for Leading Ways is to get to a place in the legal industry where we just talk about ‘leaders’ not ‘female leaders’.”

If history has taught us anything, if there is one place that can be achieved, it’s Manchester.

Next year marks a century since women won the right to practice law. Progress towards parity with male lawyers has been slow

It is fitting that the city where the suffragist movement was born is also at the forefront of the fight for equality in the legal profession.

A year after winning the right to vote in 1918, women were allowed to practice law, resulting in determined intelligent and inspirational women seizing the opportunity to qualify and practice as solicitors.

The last century has seen huge progress.

A forward moving front

In 1970, less than 10% of new entrants to the profession were female, where it remained until the 1980s.

As sex discrimination legislation started to take effect in the 1990s and the number of women increased rapidly to 23%.

These days, that figure is half the profession and is set to tip in the balance of women in the future.

But after a century or baby steps towards parity, that is where the ladders of equality appear to run out of rungs.

Because now at the senior levels of the profession, women only account for 25% of partners and the gender pay gap across the sector exceeds the national average.

What is holding women back?

Fran Eccles-Bech, chief executive of Manchester Law Society, believes the majority of law firms acknowledge there is an issue and want to change.

“I don’t think that firms need to do anything ‘more’ for women,” she said. “They need to remove the barriers and challenges that are there.

“The concept of meritocracy is, quite rightly, hugely valued in the legal profession.

“There is a prevailing view among many that no action should be taken to combat gender discrimination which also risks undermining the principle that employers should hire the best person for the job, regardless of gender or any other factor.

“Married to this is the belief that there is no ingrained ‘glass ceiling’ in law and that determined women with the right qualities can, and do, rise to the top. There are indeed many successful women in senior roles in the legal profession, from partners in law firms to QCs and judges.

“However, a glance at the statistics shows that these women are exceptions to the general rule, leaving the question: is structural inequality the reason that women are not making it into senior positions in anywhere near the same numbers as men? If so, this is not meritocracy.

“The majority of women would prefer to maintain their careers and a family if a structure existed that allowed them to do so.

“Some analysts and many women who practice law say that having children isn’t the primary reason most women leave law firms anyhow; most, they say, depart for other careers or for different ways to practice law.

“Firms will only retain women by planning programmes, and transparent and dedicated mentoring – all buttressed by strong internal support and an emphasis on the bottom-line merits of its policies.

“They should also think about generous sabbatical policies and outreach practices so that women who depart the firm to raise children have an easier time re-entering the work force when they are ready to do so.

“Shared parental leave should also be promoted much more and firms need to view childcare as a shared responsibility between men and women.

“The real solution to the gender imbalance is to change the system, not the women in it.

“The industry needs a conscious and measurable strategy for promoting women in law – not just for the good of female lawyers, but also for the good of the firms.”

A city region that likes to lead

Manchester has a history of trailblazing women in law.

Christabel Pankhurst, the daughter of women’s suffrage movement leader Emmeline Pankhurst, obtained a law degree from the University of Manchester in 1906.

But, as a woman, she was not allowed to practice law and fought but failed to join Lincoln’s Inn, a society of London-based barristers.

It wasn’t until 1920 that Marjorie Powell, a former assistant lecturer in political economy at the University of Manchester, became was the first female to join Lincoln’s Inn, paving the way for others. And there have been plenty, although only some reaching the pinnacle of the profession.

More recently we’ve seen Lady Brenda Hale, a former law lecturer at the University of Manchester from 1966 to 1984 and champion of diversity in the profession, achieve two great firsts.

In 2009, she was the first woman Justice of the Supreme Court, the highest court in the land, and last year, became its president.

Today, more than a century after Christabel Pankhurst’s vociferous campaign against her ban from practicing law, Manchester solicitor Charlotte Percy is taking action to redress the balance.

In 2016, as a result of her frustration at seeing first-hand how few women held senior positions, Percy set up Leading Ways.

The initiative involves independent mentoring and coaching, special events with inspirational women speakers, regular communications highlighting the visibility of women in leadership roles, and campaigning across the UK for firms to get more women in the boardroom.

“The response has been nothing short of overwhelming and demonstrates the desire to achieve gender equality in British boardrooms,” said the 31-year-old associate solicitor at McAlister Family Law.

“With movements such as Times Up gaining serious traction, now is the right time for Leading Ways to really blaze a trail of gender equality in the boardrooms of Great Britain,” she added.

“And I believe that the talented and powerful women in the North will lead the way.”

Percy sits on the board of Manchester Law Society and is chair of the Solicitors Group in Manchester.

“I plan to focus my efforts this year on engaging more Manchester firms, so that we as a region can become a beacon for the legal industry across the country, addressing gender inequality in the kind of practical and effective way that delivers genuine results”, she said.

“My long term vision for Leading Ways is to get to a place in the legal industry where we just talk about ‘leaders’ not ‘female leaders’.”

If history has taught us anything, if there is one place that can be achieved, it’s Manchester.

Source: Manchester Evening News

Lewis Hamilton says society is “still in the stone age” when it comes to issues such as women’s pay rights and racial equality in sport.

Hamilton was responding to the Forbes list of best-paid sportspeople, which had no women in the top 100.

The Mercedes driver said: “It shows you how behind we are in the world. There is no reason why a woman should not be able to earn what men earn.”

Four-time world champion Hamilton, 33, is 12th in the latest Forbes list.

Hamilton used the example of tennis player Serena Williams’ struggle for representative pay and equal treatment.

Williams, 36, had been 51st on the 2017 Forbes list but, having not played much in the past 12 months because of pregnancy and the birth of her first child, did not earn enough to make the rankings in 2018.

Hamilton said: “Serena is in the top three of the greatest athletes of all time, above a lot of, if not all, the people on that list, so it is a big question.

“Women rule the world. I don’t understand. It just shows you we are still in the stone age. That needs to change. When will it change? I don’t know.”

Hamilton, who is of Afro-Caribbean descent, also made a reference to the struggles of black athletes to earn the same amount through endorsements as their white rivals.

“Serena has already spoken of how difficult it is,” he said. “She has been up against Maria Sharapova and she had more results than Maria but Maria – and not just her but particularly white players she was playing against – were earning more money than her. Yet her results were higher.

“That is still the fight we have in society today. It is going to take some time to change it.”

Source: BBC Sport

Ofcom boss Sharon White says broadcasters must act to attract wider range of talent.

Ethnic minorities, disabled people and women are all under-represented in the UK’s radio industry, according to a new report, prompting warnings that its output may be out of step with what modern British audiences want to hear.

According to research by the media regulator Ofcom just 6% of staff in the sector are non-white, far below the UK population average of 14%.

Although more than half of radio employees are women, they only occupy 37% of senior management roles in the industry and are almost completely absent from boardrooms.

“Our radio sector has a huge opportunity to extend its reach and relevance to the whole UK,” said the Ofcom chief executive, Sharon White. “Our radio industry must reflect the breadth of modern society and offer listeners engaging shows that speak directly to their lives and experiences. And to do this effectively broadcasters must take further action to attract a wider range of talent, both on and off air.”

The figures show that the radio industry is well behind television when it comes to ethnic diversity, although radio does employ a higher proportion of people with disabilities.

The study of nearly 9,000 staff focused on the UK’s three biggest broadcasting groups: the BBC; Global, which owns Capital and Classic FM; and Bauer, which runs stations including Absolute and Magic.

Ofcom praised the BBC for providing detailed statistics on the backgrounds of its staff, saying the commercial sector lagged behind the BBC in terms of diversity and needs to improve its data collection if it wants to change.

The regulator said that “overall, too many broadcasters are failing to fully understand or address the diversity problem” and called on radio groups to set clear diversity targets and make chief executives responsible for implementing them.

Source: The Guardian.

National Diversity Awards

Copyrights © 2019 National Diversity Awards / All Rights Reserved

Web Design by Marketing Originals.